Kirkus Reviews: The Suffragents

https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/brooke-kroeger/the-suffragents/

June 27, 2017

KIRKUS REVIEW

An account of the role men played in pressing the case for women’s voting rights in the early years of the last century.

Kroeger (Journalism/New York Univ.; Passing: When People Can’t Be Who They Are, 2003, etc.) opens with a 1911 parade along New York’s Fifth Avenue in support of women’s right to vote, with some 5,000 marchers converging on Union Square. Among them were dozens of men who marched under the banner of the Men’s League for Woman Suffrage. “These men were not random supporters,” writes the author, “but representatives of a momentous, yet subtly managed development in the suffrage movement’s seventh decade”—namely, the careful leveraging of men in the professions, as well as the military and clergy, to endorse the cause. Among them, Kroeger enumerates, were Max Eastman, George Foster Peabody, John Dewey, and other stalwarts of progressivism. Yet, as she notes as her narrative broadens into an urgent, interesting history of women’s suffrage generally, those progressives were not always strong allies of women’s rights. Among other things, World War I diverted them from full participation in the movement, and Eastman may have trivialized the cause when he argued before striking male workers, “you dislike women’s voting and we like it, and that [is] all the argument there is between us. What can we do to persuade you?” Though mindful of the dangers of co-optation, the “suffragettes” put the “suffragents” to good work all the same. Among the pleasures of Kroeger’s carefully developed storyline is the view of how important political figures such as Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson came around to accepting the idea that women deserved the vote, an evolution helped along by arguments by the suffrage movement’s male allies until the righteousness of the cause could no longer be ignored.

A vigorous, readable revisitation of the events of a century and more ago but with plenty of subtle lessons in the book for modern-day civil rights activists, too.

 

 

National History Day contestants, please read this before you contact me.

The Suffragents won the Gold Medal in US History in the 2018 Independent Publisher Book Awards and was a finalist for the 2018 Sally and Morris Lasky Prize, presented by the Center for Political History.  See Summer Camp Newsletters” and Facebook posts from book-related appearances. Reviews, notices, and articles about my books are under their titles here. My articles are here.

Upcoming 2019: October 17: Suffragents Panel, National Archives, Washington DC.

Upcoming 2020: January 30: Learning in Retirement Program at Iona College. March 27 Ephemera Society of America, 40th annual conference, Old Greenwich CT. June 4-6Métiers et professions des médias (XVIIIe-XXIe siècles),”  Université de Lausanne (Switzerland).

Past 2019: September 23: January 29: Exhibition Opening Remarks: “Women Get the Vote: A Historic Look at the Nineteenth Amendment,“New York Society Library. February 23: Public Values in Conflict with Animal Agribusiness Practices,” UCLA Law School, Los Angeles.  March 13: The Suffragents,” Scarsdale Woman’s Club, Scarsdale NY. March 24: League of Women Voters, Albany County at the Bethlehem (NY) Public LibraryMarch 25:Judges, Lawyers, and Women’s Suffrage: Recognizing the Men Who Stood with Women on the Front Lines,” Gender Fairness Committee of the Third Judicial District, CLE, NY State Courts at SUNY Albany Law School, Albany NY. May 15: “The Republican Suffragents,” National Women’s Republican Club, New York City. August 7:  Panel, “From Emma Goldman to the Marketplace of Ideas: Marking the 100th Anniversary of Free Speech at the Supreme Court.” (page 40) AEJMC, Toronto. August 14: Webinar, National Park Service. September 23: Bentson Dean’s Lecture, College of Arts and Science, New York University.